Boundless in laboratory staffing
 
We are looking for
chemical analysts
News
   

Killercell cures cancer

Killercell cures cancer

MAASTRICHT, February 28, 2012 - Researchers from Maastricht UMC + were able to cure cancer in mice by using so-called natural killer cells (in scientific terms, donor NK cells). There is no reason to suppose that the principle would not also work in humans.

MAASTRICHT, February 28, 2012 - Researchers from Maastricht UMC + were able to cure cancer in mice by using so-called natural killer cells (in scientific terms, donor NK cells). There is no reason to suppose that the principle would not also work in humans.


The problem with metastatic breast cancer is that a small number of cells, called tumor stem cells, from the outset to be insensitive to treatment. The resistant tumor stem cells arise after treatment that rapidly dividing cells eventually become resistant to all standard treatments. These are completely resistant metastases that ultimately the patient will die.
Such chemotherapy-resistant cells were recently by the team of Dr. Michel van Gelder and Dr. Lotte Wieten also found in commonly used mouse model for breast cancer. Longer ago, the team of Dr. Michel van Gelder and Dr. Lotte Wieten already established that healing was possible by transplantation of both bone marrow and immune cells from donor mice. These donor mice differed from the diseased mice at major transplant characteristics, creating a so-called rejection reaction was triggered as a result of which the diseased cells in the mouse were slain. The major drawback of this treatment was that the rejection reaction is often not limited to the tumor. Many mice deceased still a rejection reaction that also attacked healthy cells.
It was therefore sought a method that a donor rejection reaction brought about without the healthy cells were affected. It is known that the undesired rejection reactions are caused by donor T-cells, while donor-NK-cells (natural killer) do not. It was found possible, the donor T-cells should be separated from the donor-NK-cells, and only this donor-NK-cells transplanted into the mice with metastatic cancer. So glad surprise of the researchers only confirmed the fact that transplantation of donor NK cells was very effective. The mice were cured of the cancer, and moreover, without any side effects.
Human NK cells also have this effect, it has now been demonstrated in the laboratory. The next step is that the method can actually be tested on patients. That further research can be started with a donation of 83,600 euros from the Dutch-American organization A Sister's Hope. In addition also supports Cancer Research Fund Limburg project.
In the specialized journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment is a publication http://www.springerlink.com/content/ft361622803v273j/ recently appeared on the research of Van Gelder and Wieten.

Source: www.azm.nl

29-02-2012

Top vacancies in the picture

Everyday ScientIQ offers the newest vancancies

References

Take a look at our references